How Paper Rusts

start the two way monologues that speak your mind

90,193 notes

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

ewatsondaily:

"I decided that I was a feminist. This seemed uncomplicated to me. But my recent research has shown me that feminism has become an unpopular word. Women are choosing not to identify as feminists. Apparently, [women’s expression is] seen as too strong, too aggressive, anti-men, unattractive."

(via iwantlovelikethemovies)

2,856 notes

remylaforgewilbury:

Before he became known as one of the most amazing actors in history, Steve Buscemi was a firefighter for New York’s Engine 55. Upon the collapse of the World Trade Center towers, Buscemi dug out is old gear and volunteered to rescue the trapped and recover the deceased. It’s inspiring to know that a person who could do nothing and take no flack for his choice decided to do everything he could because he knew that there were family members and friends who needed closure, and he knew that the sooner the job was done, the sooner an entire nation could begin to heal. He was skilled and equipped to make it happen, and he also had a caring, genuine, humanitarian heart.

On this anniversary of the attacks, I don’t want to rile everyone up with the “America! F**k, yeah!” attitude. I just want to remind people that, at one time during my lifespan, the citizens of the USA were truly united. Not because of patriotism or politics…but because many were devastated, and the rest had reached such a deep level of empathy that they could be nothing but helpful and supportive of their neighbors. For once in my lifetime, humankind was something to be proud of. Why’d we forget so quickly?

(via snychronicles)

237 notes

austinkleon:

Edward Gorey’s covers for Doubleday Anchor Paperbacks

From goreyography.com:

In April 1953, Anchor opened up a new market for paperbacks: the “serious” or academic book. They were the brainchild of twenty-five year old Jason Epstein who convinced Doubleday of the market need for such books in paper editions particularly suited for college use. Epstein’s research so impressed the Doubleday executives that they created such a line and made him editor. The format was the same as the taller mass market size (Signet, Ballantine, etc.), but higher in price: 65¢ to $1.45. Anchor was well received from the start, reaching a mass audience through trade book outlets, campus bookstores and some drugstores. And they had Edward Gorey in charge of the covers.

As art editor, Gorey was responsible for the total cover package, supplying the lettering, typography and design layouts. Often other artist contributed the actual illustration: Leonard Baskin, Milton Glaser, Philippe Julian and even Andy Warhol; but Gorey then designed the finished product lending a uniform appearance to the whole line.

Gorey worked in this capacity from 1953 until 1960, a period which roughly corresponds with Anchor’s first two hundred titles. About a fourth of these have line drawn covers by Gorey. He also designed various covers for Vintage, Capricorn, Compass and other publications that followed Anchor’s lead.

Browse a wonderful set of these covers on Flickr→

Filed under: Edward Gorey